Available to Passport members only

Play Boston

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson goes to the greater Boston area to learn more about Portuguese, Brazilian, and Cape Verdean food traditions. Marcus eats Portuguese chowder with halibut on a fishing boat, visits a Portuguese marketplace where he tries plenty of bacalhau, and later, in a home kitchen, he makes a bacalhau gratin with cheese and potatoes.

Available to Passport members only

Play Las Vegas

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson visits Las Vegas to learn more about the city’s long-standing Chinese community and their food traditions. He makes hand-pulled noodles and Peking duck, eats regional favorites from xiao long bar and beef noodle soup to cumin lamb and fish braised in clay pots.

Available to Passport members only

Play Philadelphia

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson heads to Philadelphia, where he meets new friends and old, and learns more about the city’s Italian food scene. Italian-Americans have been driving food culture in the U.S. for over a century, and Philadelphia is one of the original hubs for both classic and modern Italian cuisine.

Available to Passport members only

Play Houston

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson visits Houston to learn more about food and community in the Nigerian and greater West African diaspora. Centered around the large Nigerian population but also focused on Senegalese, Ghanaian, and other West African cultures, the episode explores how West African immigrants preserve recipes and food traditions and re-contextualize them in the Houston dining scene.

Available to Passport members only

Play Los Angeles

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson arrives in sunny Los Angeles to meet with Armenians influencing the city's food scene. Armenian food is diaspora food — the community is widespread, building homes in countries like Turkey and Syria following the Armenian Genocide.

Available to Passport members only

Play Seattle

Content rating: TV-PG

Host Marcus Samuelsson goes to Seattle, where he spends time with immigrant and second-generation Filipinos who are taking charge of their city's food scene. As Filipino food gains more national, mainstream recognition, members of the community are working to tell the story on their own terms.

Supported by