Play We Are Blood

Content rating: TV-PG

Alberta, Canada. During his visit with the Blood Tribe on the Blackfoot Nation, Monty learns how the first people are coping in the aftermath of cultural genocide. Despite being stripped of their land, tradition, language, and identity, Monty finds timeless wisdom even in the midst of great struggle, as well as powerful lessons of hope, forgiveness, redemption, and love.

Play The Goodlands

Content rating: TV-PG

Kensington, North Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Set in a part of Philadelphia often referred to as “The Badlands,” Monty finds himself immersed in the largest open air drug market in the United States, where thousands of needles, filth and waste are scattered across streets and parks, despite an unending cycle of efforts to curb the problem.

Play The County That Built The Country

Content rating: TV-PG

McDowell County, West Virginia. Once one of the wealthiest counties in America and home to the first billion dollar company, McDowell has been called the county that built the country. But with most coal mines closed, it is now among the poorest places, and suffers the shortest life expectancy and highest death rate from opioids of all 3,142 counties in the USA.

Play The River

Content rating: TV-PG

Laredo, Texas. Home to the largest inland port in the USA, Monty visits people whose lives are shaped by their proximity to the Rio Grande, which has long been the United States Mexico border.

Play My Father Was A Fisherman

Content rating: TV-PG

Port Clyde, Maine. Despite being difficult and often thankless work, for over a century the residents of this idyllic fishing village have followed their ancestors footsteps, and answered the mysterious call of the sea. Fishing these waters is their first passion and love, but there are many pitfalls and challenges.

Play The Divide

Content rating: TV-PG

Brunswick, Georgia. This coastal town in Southern Georgia is where a young black man, Ahmaud Arbery, was killed. Monty sits down with Ahmaud’s father and uncle, local activists and community leaders, and even those who celebrate the confederate flag. But as Monty learns the truth from the men and women closest to this tragedy, instead of division, he finds love, mutual respect, and unity.

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